Botto’s Bakery Going Strong After 67 Years

The Bangor Daily News has published a article about Botto’s Bakery,

Overseeing the process that plays out night after night is Stephen Mathews, the second-generation owner of the family-run bakery founded in 1949. Chances are if you’ve had a lobster roll or hamburger, sandwich or sub in southern Maine, you’ve tried Botto’s. It supplies rolls to 20 clam shacks, but delis and sandwich shops are its bread and butter.

Beer Advocate Profile of Bissell Brothers

Beer Advocate magazine has published a profile of Bissell Brothers authored by Adam Callaghan.

In two and a half years, the Bissells have positioned themselves as pioneers pushing limits: their own, their customers’, the beer world’s. Their company’s design and mentality seem to appeal to fans as much as the actual product does. Theirs is a lifestyle brand, selling a signature triangular logo and the image of the carefree cool crowd, which happens to drink dank, hoppy beers that are hazy as hell.

Old Port Sea Grill

The Portland Phoenix has published an article about the Old Port Sea Grill.

According to General Manager Justin C. St. Louis, guests can expect to experience an “elevated Old Port Sea Grill” in the coming weeks, as new Executive Chef Christopher Pierce takes the reins. Pierce, formerly of Denver, has an impressive resume: he’s staged at the prestigious Alinea in Chicago, and also worked for several Michelin-starred restaurants and under James Beard Award-winning chefs.

Sisters Gourmet Deli

The Portland Phoenix has published an article about Sisters Gourmet Deli.

She called to inquire anyway, and decided to try to make it work. “It was a good decision. We have the best location for a sandwich shop,” she said.

The Sisters’ menu features several mouth-watering sandwiches, all made four ways. You can get your sandwich on house-baked herb bread (with rosemary, garlic, Italian, and seasoning); have it on a wrap; on gluten-free bread (also baked every morning); or as a salad.

Portland’s Food Truck Fleet

The Blueberry Files has published a survey of the Portland area food truck fleet.

Forget robins, the true sign of the return of nice weather in Maine is the food truck. Sure, some business owners tough it out year round, but most take the winter off. Now that it’s warming up, chefs are tuning up their trucks and motoring to where people are lounging on the Eastern Prom, drinking beer on brewery’s patios, and spending the day at the beach. Bring on the warm weather and the food trucks!

Piccolo Commentary

Food writer Erik Neilsen has kicked off a new column on the local site Hot Trash with an article about Piccolo,

In the 2 or so years that I’ve been eating at Piccolo, ideas and notions I once held about “Italian food” and what that phrase actually means have been shattered entirely. Southern Italian cuisine in particular is so rich in history and depth that I feel I’ve just begun to scratch the surface of what it means to cook and enjoy it today, from here. You’ll be hard-pressed to find a better introduction to the ingredients, stories and people characteristic of this part of the world without actually going there than a meal at Piccolo—do yourself a favor and kick it off with a plate of the pulpo.

CN Traveler: Press Hotel

A Condé Nast Traveler article about the Press Hotel highlights the role the Portland food scene has played in the development of the city.

On the coattails of a truly impressive food renaissance that began in 1996 with Sam Hayward’s Fore Street, gathered speed with Rob Evans’ 2000 reincarnation of Hugo’s, and got truly hot around 2012 with the debut of Eventide Oyster Co., Portland found itself—and then got found. By the time I visited in 2015 momentum was heavy, propelled by a slew of James Beard Award nominations including Best New Restaurant, for Central Provisions, just a few blocks from the Press; Best Chefs in the Northeast for Eventide owners Andrew Taylor and Mike Wiley; and Rising Star Chef for Cara Stadler of Bao Bao Dumpling House. Next to Eventide, Wiley and Taylor had just opened Honey Paw, their brilliantly quirky take on noodle bars; and a block south Damian Sansonetti had begun his love song to Italian at Piccolo. And on and on. As food towns go, Portland had gone from simmer to full-on boil.

25 Years at Becky’s Diner

The Forecaster has published an article about Becky’s Diner. Becky’s recently celebrated their 25th anniversary.

“We had a line the first day; I ended up doing dishes because we had not staffed up,” she said. “I think the whole waterfront was rooting for me. I hope they came back for the food.”

With her home riding on her business, Rand said failure was not an option.

Maine & Loire/Drifter’s Wife

Sweet has posted an article about Peter and Orenda Hale and their two Washington Ave businesses Drifter’s Wife and Maine & Loire.

While opening a natural wine shop like Maine & Loire in a place like Brooklyn might be the long-awaited puzzle piece in certain burgeoning, hip neighborhoods of the borough, that wasn’t necessarily the case for Portland. It was a risk, and one that not only paid off, but led to their newest venture: Drifters Wife, a wine bar tucked inside of the shop.