South Portland Food Cupboard

The Bangor Daily News has posted a report on the work of the South Portland Food Cupboard.

On Thursday mornings, when the doors of the South Portland Food Cupboard swing open, low-income families can’t believe their eyes.

“The produce is so absolutely beautiful that our clients just cry,” said director Sybil Riemensnider, who receives the weekly bounty from Jordan’s Farm in Cape Elizabeth. “These are things they can’t afford.”

Leigh Kellis from Holy Donut

MaineBiz has published an article about Leigh Kellis and her company The Holy Donut.

But creating a decadent but wholesome treat “was like a mission from God,” she says. “I love doughnuts and the idea of bringing it to Portland was exciting.”

Once she hit on a winning potato-based recipe, she brought six doughnuts to Coffee By Design’s Washington Avenue store to see if they’d sell. They did and she brought back a dozen the next day. Soon she got orders from Whole Foods Market and Lois’ Natural Marketplace and rented commercial kitchen space. Forty dozen doughnuts a week became 100 dozen. After eight months, she was yearning for a doughnut shop of her own.

Rwandan Bean Co.

Today’s Press Herald includes an article about the Rwandan Bean Company in Portland.

Mwenedata, 30, and Mazuroski, 28, are the founders of the year-old Rwanda Bean Co., a coffee bean wholesaler. They’re also philanthropists. Or at least that’s the plan.

By buying coffee beans directly from a farmer’s cooperative in the western Rwandan province of Karora, they cut out the middleman coffee broker and pay the farmers more. But their commitment to giving back doesn’t stop there.

You can learn more about Rwanda Bean on their website rwandabean.com.

The Hop Yard

The Press Herald has posted a report on The Hop Yard, a Maine-based hop farm that’s helping making Maine beer a bit more local.

In a few weeks, all the hops surrounding us will be harvested and used by Maine and New Hampshire breweries. Allagash, Sebago, Rising Tide, Austin Street and Tributary brewing companies all plan on brewing beers with hops grown by the Hop Yard.

Though the hop industry in Maine is far from being able to supply Maine brewers with all their hops, Keating is optimistic that The Hop Yard will continue to grow in scale and other farmers will follow their model, helping Maine become a thriving producer of hops.

Port City Bakeries

The new issue of Portland Magazine includes a survey of some of the city’s better bakeries: Standard, Portland Patisserie, Tandem, Dutch’s, and Ten Ten Pié.

We marvel at the sheer number of restaurants in the Forest City, but how about the bakeries? Portland is the center of the universe for from-scratch, flakey, buttery, first-class baked treats. Hot, fresh scones; lighter-than-air croissants; deadly sweet sticky buns; cookies; breads; and rolls are baked every day in small, thriving hives all over town.

Tempo Dulu

The Bangor Daily News  has published a profile of Tempo Dulu, the new restaurant located in the Danforth Inn.

It begins with the bread basket, or lack thereof. Instead of rolls and butter, pastel lobster rice crackers — think shrimp crackers but with lobster flavor — with nutty hot sauce arrive on the white-clothed table to coax your taste buds into a new rhythm, the lively sway of Portland’s new restaurant Tempo Dulu.

Evo

Eating Portland Alive has published a set photos and some commentary on Evo.

That being said, I greatly enjoyed my meal at EVO and I would not hesitate to steer diners in their direction. The stars of the evening for me were the meat courses. The duck meatballs, lamb loin, sweetbreads, and chicken livers were all stand-outs. I also greatly appreciated the bartender’s efforts to develop a selection of mocktails while the other guests were offered wine pairings. I think that EVO is a strong addition to both the growing Mediterranean niche and Portland’s food scene in general.

Sam Lives! Smoothies

The Press Herald has a report on a new smoothy line from Maine called Sam Lives! run by Samantha Levin.

Some would say smoothies run in Samantha Levin’s veins. Including Levin herself.

“I have a love for smoothies and juices because I came from a family where we were always playing around with them,” said Levin, 24, who launched a new line of bottled, superfood smoothies called Sam Lives! at the Portland Whole Foods Market earlier this month. The store sold out of its initial order of 500 bottles in two days.

Those of you who were in Portland back in the ’90s will remember the Fresh Samantha line of smoothies. That company was launched by Levin’s parents and named for Levin.