Forager

Today’s Press Herald includes an article on Forager, a Maine start-up company that connects chefs and markets with local farmers.

Known as Forager, the company now has over 150 farms in its supplier network and has been signing up new buyers such as restaurants, grocers and food distributors. The company recently signed Wiley’s restaurant group, Big Tree Hospitality, as a client and is in a pilot program with a large grocery chain that Forager will not yet name.

NYT: Elda in Biddeford

The New York Times has published an article about Elda in Biddeford.

Many of the markers of modern American restaurants are there: a drinks list featuring natural wines and creative cocktails, dishes with influences from Japanese and new Nordic cuisine. But where else are you likely to find a doughnut filled with crab, chiles and fudgy egg yolk? (Verdict: surprisingly spicy, with a tinge of sweetness from the powdered sugar and malt vinegar powder dusting.)

Cabot Cove

Today’s Press Herald includes an article about Cabot Cove, a Maine-themed restaurant located in Japan.

Cabot Cove opened on Aug. 11, 2008. Nestled in the forest, the restaurant is open year-round from 6:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday through Tuesday. It closes for two to three weeks at the end of May through the beginning of June for the Deguchis’ annual trip to Maine. Cabot Cove serves American-style food, breakfast and brunch, with forks, spoons and knives – no chopsticks.

Crepe Elizabeth

The Forecaster has published an article about the Crepe Elizabeth food truck.

Haaf and Stinson’s approach to their cooking and menu is a simple: eight crepe dishes, four sweet and four savory, ranging from $5-10.

Stinson said their most popular crepe is La Classique, which is topped with nutella, strawberries and bananas. One of their more hearty dishes is La Complete; a traditional crepe with cage-free egg, uncured ham and cheese.

Gritty’s Turns 30

Maine Today and The Forecaster have published articles about Gritty’s 30-year anniversary.

Before throwing back a few pints of Gritty’s well-known ales and lagers, imagine the world of brewing in 1988. While only a handful of the nation’s breweries that were opened in the pioneer years of the 1980s and 1990s still exist, several big names remain. The famous Class of ’88 includes Brooklyn Brewery (Brooklyn, New York), Deschutes Brewing Company (Bend, Oregon) and Vermont Pub & Brewery. If you ask Stebbins what’s changed in the last 30 years, he’ll tell you, “pretty much everything.”

Vegan Ice Cream

Wednesday’s Press Herald reports on the growing number of local options for vegan ice cream.

“People went crazy for it,” said Kelley. “And those who had tried our ice cream that weekend ended up telling everyone they knew. Before we knew it, people were coming into the Market House looking for the vegan ice cream.”

Ashley said the demand was too big to ignore, causing Sticky Sweet to pivot from sticky rice to vegan ice cream (which Sticky Sweet calls a “frozen plant-based treat.”)

Maine Food for Thought

Mainebiz and The Blueberry Files have published articles on Maine Food for Thought.

The tour started at Union, where we heard an introduction from Bryce and then from chef Josh Berry. Maine Food for Thought features businesses that, according to Bryce, “go beyond their bottom line to source locally and sustainably.” Union’s menu is shaped by local produce availability, with the menu often being determined by what’s available at the farmers’ market.

Liquid Riot

The Bollard has published a profile of Liquid Riot.

“We do everything,” said owner Eric Michaud, “we can’t have one part without the others here. There’s a synergy to it.” Nationwide, there are still only a dozen or so brewery/distillery combinations out there. It’s difficult to manage two alcoholic-beverage-producing operations in concert, let alone with the addition of a full-service restaurant and bar, but after five years, Liquid Riot seems to have it handled. Michaud, who also founded Novare Res Bier Café, a renowned craft-beer bar in the Old Port, works with his small, close-knit team to accomplish something that others have not even dared to attempt.