Archive for July, 2010

Under Construction: Canelli’s

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

Canelli’s is a new Italian restaurant that’s under construction at 7 Exchange St (photo). As part of their liquor license application, they’ve submitted a draft menu (see page 51) and floor plan (see page 50). The cover letter (see page 37) from the owners states that they ran a 150 seat Italian restaurant in Medfield, MA for 8 years. “Our plan is to offer good Italian food, a comfortable and pleasant atmosphere, reasonable and affordable prices, and become the spot where the people in the area want to come.”

Top 10 Under $10

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Broke 207 has posted her list of the 10 best things to eat in Portland for under $10 dollars.

in honor of this historic decision, i have decided to list my top ten things in town that are worth eating for under $10. not necessarily full meals, and definitely not always high end, but goddamn delicious and easily accessible.   i will probably be calling on this list fairly often over the next few weeks, so help a girl out, and gimme some more recommendations.

SoPoish Cookies

Friday, July 30th, 2010

The Forecaster has published a survey of cookies in South Portland and Cape Elizabeth.

Almost within walking distance of each other, Cambridge Coffee Bar & Bakehouse and JulChris Cookies in South Portland have joined the Cookie Jar in Cape Elizabeth and Scratch Baking in South Portland as locally owned businesses offering sweet treats and a cup of Joe.

Grains to Glass: Dogfish at Novare Res

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

The What Ales You column in today’s Press Herald writes about last weekend’s Dogfish Head event at Novare Res. Sam Calagione, the breweries founder and president, was on hand for the event.

“From Grains to Glass: Gnarly Meets Barley” was a party on the patio with employees and boards from Grain surfboards, more than 23 beers from Dogfish Head on display, and a crew from Discovery Channel filming a show that is expected to be shown sometime in spring 2011.

And there was one beer that had never been served to the public before.

Jeff & Cheryl Buerhaus

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

The new issue of Maine Ahead includes an article about Jeff & Cheryl Buerhaus and their restaurant Walter’s.

Buerhaus has as much concern about the textures as the tastes of his menu. His Loch Duart Salmon (see recipe below), for instance, is wrapped in edible rice paper and gently grilled with a fresh cilantro leaf placed on top of it, leaving behind a lacy appliqué. The accompanying bamboo-scented rice and sesame spinach add a unique flavor and color effect. “The entire dish—the look, the colors, the textures, and, of course, the flavors—all play a role in making it a success,” Buerhaus says.

Gluten-Free Pizza

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

Mitten Machen tells all about the off-menu gluten-free pizza option at Flatbread.

The dough is made with chickpea and rice flour, as well as all the familiar GF starches. It tastes like a nutty whole-wheat crust, and serves as a neutral backdrop for toppings. Mine didn’t char like the traditional crust, but it held together and supported toppings without becoming a brick.

Immigrant Kitchens: Eritrean Ingera with Spicy Chicken

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

Lindsay Sterling over at Immigrant Kitchens met up with Asmeret Teklu at Asmara where she learned how to make Eritrean Ingera with Spicy Chicken (intro, photos, recipe).

When Asmeret arrived here thirteen years ago, a friend gave her some starter. Ever since then, Asmeret’s been using the reminder of her batter as the starter for the next batch. “But where did your friend get her starter?” I asked. She laughs at my guessing, “There is no beginning.” I think maybe in addition to evolutionism and creationism we should be teaching our children ingera-ism. There simply is no beginning…

Want to make it yourself but not sure where to get the ingredients? Lindsay has offered to mail out portions of “berbere spice, teff flour, teff starter, and ghee” so you can give this recipe a try.

Breakfast, Menu Creation, Vegan Cooking

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Today’s Press Herald includes an article about the business of breakfast,

Breakfast’s flexible pricing is another thing that [Bintliff’s owner Joe] Catoggio thinks makes it successful and “recession-proof.” A full meal could cost only $7 or an extravagant lobster eggs Benedict with a mimosa could cost a lot more. The price range attracts everyone from college students to successful business professionals, he said.

insight into how chefs plan and change their menus,

Some menus change daily. Others change every few weeks or months, following the swell of the seasons or the whims of the kitchen.

Two Maine restaurants, the Salt Exchange in Portland and Natalie’s at the Camden Harbour Inn, recently offered a peek into the process of how they change their menus.

a Natural Foodie article on the upcoming visit to Portland by chef Mark Anthony, a proponent of lowering cholesterol through eating a plant-based diet,

He doesn’t hope you’ll buy the latest food prep gadget. He’s not trying to sign you up for a diet plan with meals shipped straight to your door. He won’t entice you with a shiny stack of cookbooks.

Instead, he’ll let you watch him cook, and then he’ll serve you a full-course meal. For free.

Food & Fundraising

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Wines;Tasted! has reported on the success of 2 recent wine & food charitable events: Tastes of France for Share Our Strength and the 3rd 20/20 wine event for Ingraham’s Spiral Arts.

On Sunday the 18 I, along with Tabitha from Crush, Scot from Davine, and Steve from Wicked hosted the third 20/20 charity wine tasting on Caiola’s back patio.  It was gorgeous weather and holding the tasting outside shaded by a big old maple allowed us to really take advantage of it.  We showcased 20 unusual wines from southern France and also managed to raise over $1100 for Ingraham’s Spiral Arts program which focuses on engaging the elderly.

Thanksgiving’s Closed

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

According to a report in the American Journal, Thanksgiving’s in Westbrook went out of business last week. (via Westbrook Diarist)

It’s no longer Turkey Day every day on the rotary in Westbrook. Thanksgiving’s Bakery and Eatery shut its doors last week after about four years of serving up rotisserie turkey and a variety of baked goods.

Iron Chef at the Whole Grocer

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Edible Obsessions has published memories of her days as the resident cook at the old Whole Grocer.

There were needs: vegan muffins, vegan cookies, two soups, two hot dishes, sandwiches and deli items. Mostly all vegan. Every day was playing a bit of (the original) Iron Chef, the mystery ingredients you’d have to create with wouldn’t be revealed until a box of produce or grocery items were culled and left. Dandelion Greens? Quinoa? Seitan? Huh? So, long before I was roasting pork bellies and failing miserably at pickling a cow’s tongue, I was a vegan and, sometimes, raw cook. And, honestly, it made me the cook I am now.

Fish Exchange, Open Farm Day, Packing Salmon

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Today’s Press Herald includes a visit to Upper Farm Alpacas in Pownal on Sunday’s Open Farm Day,

Greg and Nicole Carter, owners of Upper Farm Alpacas, said they began their business in 2005 with the intention of getting only a few alpacas for the fiber they yield. She said the more research they did, the quicker they fell in love with alpacas.

a Maine at Work column on prepping and packing Salmon,

Behind Malia, a half-dozen or so people were on the salmon-cutting conveyor belt line. One man chopped off the head and tail, then a fillet machine cut open the fish. More men trimmed the fillets, another machine deboned the fish, then someone else plucked out the peskiest bones using tweezers. The fish was then inspected before being packed.

and an article about a call for aid from the Portland Fish Exchange,

The city last week mailed a letter to the owners of more than 60 groundfishing vessels. The future of the Portland Fish Exchange is now uncertain, the letter says, and it needs increased fish landings to ensure its continued operation.

WhaddaPita is Now Open

Monday, July 26th, 2010

yourgrandmas_mapWhaddaPita opened for business on Sunday.

They’re located in the space on Forest Avenue formerly occupied by Chef et al. It looks like they’ve got some outdoor seating out front.

Review of Nosh

Monday, July 26th, 2010

pArts has published a review of Nosh.

You’re going to love or hate this place – I don’t see much of an in between. Me? I love it. Nosh may have what has become my favorite sandwich in Maine: The Pig Belly Reuben. The pork belly was slow cooked and had “Sunday afternoon comfort food” written all over it.

This Week’s Events

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Wednesday — a tasting of organic wines at Old Port Wine Merchants and a Wine Wise class at The Wine Bar.

Thursday — the 3rd Annual Sushi & Sake Tasting at Browne Trading and the monthly Latte Art Competition at Bard Coffee.

Saturday — the 8th Annual Festival of Nations in Deering Oaks Park. For more info read the recent articles in the Portland Daily Sun and the Portland Press Herald.

Farmer’s Markets — the traditional series of Farmer’s Markets are taking place Monday (Monument Square), Wednesday (Monument Square) and Saturday (Deering Oaks Park). Cultivating Community is running their new series of markets Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at various locations around the city.

For more information on these and other upcoming food happenings in the area, visit the event calendar.

If you are holding a food event this week that’s not listed above, publicize it by adding it as a comment to this post.

Review of the Chebeague Island Inn

Sunday, July 25th, 2010

The Chebeague Island Inn received 3½ stars from the Taste & Tell Review in the Maine Sunday Telegram.

During the hottest time of the summer you want to escape the heat, even if only for dinner. A meal at an oceanside inn like the Chebeague Island Inn, presiding over the western side of the island and offering good dinners and a fabulous view, is just the ticket.

Food Cart Space Competition & Orange Lobster

Saturday, July 24th, 2010

The Portland Daily Sun published a report on the competition for prime locations among Portland food  cart vendors.

Most pushcart food vendors will tell you there’s an unspoken agreement among the 23 licensed sidewalk restaurateurs currently operating in Portland: Once you get a spot, stick with it, and no one will mess with you.

But this agreement can at times clash with the official stance of the city, which doesn’t recognize street cart vendors’ seniority. And some vendors say that competition, especially on Commerical Street, can get fierce.

The newspaper also includes an article on a rare orange lobster that’s on display at Harbor Fish Market.

Ben Alfiero, owner of Harbor Fish Market on Custom House Wharf, has seen a lot of lobsters over his 35 years in the business, but this is only the second orange one to have graced his tanks.

Amedeo Reali

Saturday, July 24th, 2010

Today’s Press Herald observes the passing of Amedeo J. Reali, the long time owner of the old Village Cafe.

Mr. Reali took his father’s business, the Village Cafe, from a small, 20-seat cafe established in 1936 to a 500-seat Italian family restaurant. Even when the popular restaurant closed in December 2007, he still had his hand in the works.

“He wanted to work two days a week, which was Tuesday and Thursday lunch,” said his son, who had taken over the restaurant. “He still watched things closely, especially the sauce. That was one recipe he wanted to protect.”

For more information see the official obituary notice.

Vervacious Now Open

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Vervacious, a retail store specializing in “voyage inspired fancy foods”, is now open at 227 Commercial Street.

Red’s Dairy Freeze Demolition

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

According to a report in The Forecaster the Red’s Dairy Freeze building is going to be demolished and owner hopes to eventually rebuild. Red’s was seriously damaged by fire earlier this year.

Code Enforcement Officer Patricia Doucette said the owner of Red’s has obtained a city permit to demolish the popular, soft-serve ice cream shop that was scorched by an early morning electrical fire on May 16.

Doucette said owner Chris Bolling indicated he would raze all but two ground layers of concrete and rebuild on the existing foundation. The permit, issued last week, is good for six months, she said.

For more information see the Portland Press Herald article published 7/24/2010.