Paper Food: Cooking Matters, Pecan Pie, Macrobiotics . . .

The Food & Dining section in today’s Press Herald includes article about Cooking Matters, a program that “recruits local culinary and nutrition professionals to teach low-income families on a limited budget how to prepare nutritious meals that also taste good”, and interviews with macrobiotic educator Warren Kramer and Ethan Toby, sous chef at Sonny’s.
Yesterday’s edition of the Portland Daily Sun provides advice on where to source ingredients for you home Mexican cooking and a reminder that Two Fat Cats made the cut for a Yankee magazine article about where to find the best 5 holiday pies in New England.

John “Sonny” Severino, 80

John “Sonny” Severino, longtime co-owner of the Sportsman’s Grill, has passed away.

For nearly 50 years, he ran the former Sportsman’s Grill on Congress Street, a popular restaurant where people from all walks of life gathered to watch sports. It was the place to go after events at the Portland Expo Center, and before the annual Portland and Deering high school football game on Thanksgiving Day.

The Sportsman’s Grill operated 1952-1999 on Congress Street near the intersection with Gilman Street. John Severino operated the restaurant with his two brothers and for the last 13 years of its existence with his son Paul.

John "Sonny" Severino, 80

John “Sonny” Severino, longtime co-owner of the Sportsman’s Grill, has passed away.

For nearly 50 years, he ran the former Sportsman’s Grill on Congress Street, a popular restaurant where people from all walks of life gathered to watch sports. It was the place to go after events at the Portland Expo Center, and before the annual Portland and Deering high school football game on Thanksgiving Day.

The Sportsman’s Grill operated 1952-1999 on Congress Street near the intersection with Gilman Street. John Severino operated the restaurant with his two brothers and for the last 13 years of its existence with his son Paul.

Cockeyed Gull & Outdoor Dining

The Portland Daily Sun has published a profile of Cockeyed Gull on Peaks Island and an article about the risks and rewards of outdoor dining in Portland.

I recently read a blog comment that “you don’t go to Peaks Island for the food.” I would agree with the addition of one word: you don’t go to Peaks Island only for the food. But once you are there, the Cockeyed Gull is among the lovely places for a meal. The back deck offers a view across the harbor at Portland’s skyline unobscured by streetlights, dock detritus or people. Herbs grow in planters atop the railing and while the rest of the food has to be brought in by ferry, it’s no more than the twenty-minute ferry ride older than anything you’d buy on the mainland.

Cockeyed Gull & Outdoor Dining

The Portland Daily Sun has published a profile of Cockeyed Gull on Peaks Island and an article about the risks and rewards of outdoor dining in Portland.

I recently read a blog comment that “you don’t go to Peaks Island for the food.” I would agree with the addition of one word: you don’t go to Peaks Island only for the food. But once you are there, the Cockeyed Gull is among the lovely places for a meal. The back deck offers a view across the harbor at Portland’s skyline unobscured by streetlights, dock detritus or people. Herbs grow in planters atop the railing and while the rest of the food has to be brought in by ferry, it’s no more than the twenty-minute ferry ride older than anything you’d buy on the mainland.