Impact

The Press Herald has followed up with some of those mentioned in this week’s New York Times article on Portland food  to see what the impact of the “second course of food glory” has had on their businesses.

Potocki made three dozen extra bagels Thursday in anticipation of a rush. He still sold out of some items on his menu by 2 p.m., which is unprecedented for him. He said he was seeing a lot of new customers from other suburbs, such as Falmouth and Cumberland.

“It’s been pretty major,” Potocki said. “I didn’t really know what to expect, to tell you the truth.”

A Look Back

The Portland Phoenix has published a brief look back at what changes the past decade has brought to Portland’s restaurant landscape.

Just 10 years ago, when there were a handful of “foodie” enclaves, no one could have imagined the proliferation to come. Sam Hayward and Rob Evans would each take home the James Beard Award for Best Chef Northeast. The Commissary and the Portland Public Market would come and go, but more would come: Vignola, 555, Cinque Terre, Hugo’s, Salt Exchange, Grace, Farmer’s Table, Bar Lola, Caiola’s, Blue Spoon, Local 188, Evangeline, Bresca, Miyake .

Ocean Approved Get's Kelp Farming Lease

Mainebiz has published an article on Ocean Approved Co.’s new lease to farm kelp in Casco Bay.

“Kelp aquaculture is a $7 billion a year industry worldwide,” says Paul Dobbins, president of Ocean Approved. “Twenty-eight countries now cultivate kelp, but it’s not happening here in the United States. That’s too bad because this is an aquaculture product that is beneficial to the environment. There is zero discharge, we don’t feed it any fertilizer, and it’s highly nutritious. We see tremendous opportunity for growing vegetables that don’t require freshwater, fertilizer or any arable land.”

Ocean Approved Get’s Kelp Farming Lease

Mainebiz has published an article on Ocean Approved Co.’s new lease to farm kelp in Casco Bay.

“Kelp aquaculture is a $7 billion a year industry worldwide,” says Paul Dobbins, president of Ocean Approved. “Twenty-eight countries now cultivate kelp, but it’s not happening here in the United States. That’s too bad because this is an aquaculture product that is beneficial to the environment. There is zero discharge, we don’t feed it any fertilizer, and it’s highly nutritious. We see tremendous opportunity for growing vegetables that don’t require freshwater, fertilizer or any arable land.”

Farm-to-Table List

Travel and Leisure has included Cinque Terre on their list of Great Farm-to-Table restaurants.

When chef Lee Skawinski travels around Italy each year, he′s not just sourcing recipes. Strains of beans, squash, and lettuce from the area wind up on a five-acre farm in Greene, Maine, then at his Italian restaurant 45 miles from there, in downtown Portland—proving that farm-to-table cooking can have geographic underpinnings an ocean away.

Great Wall Super Buffet

The Great Wall Super Buffet in South Portland was sued yesterday by nine former employees. MPBN was at the restaurant today and broadcast this story.

One day after a lawsuit filed by nine former workers against the Great Wall Super Buffet in South Portland was made public, the restaurant was closed without explanation today, and Chinese workers staged an angry protest and a press conference to discuss their treatment. They claim they were not paid overtime, forced to work for tips only and required to pay the restaurant owners bi-weekly “kickbacks.” The former workers and their supporters are demanding an investigation and asking customers to join a boycott.

Maine Fare, etc

The Food & Dining section in today’s Press Herald includes a pair of articles about Maine Fare which is taking place in Camden next month. Meredith Goad authored an overview of the food festival

If you’d like to learn how to pair Maine-made spirits with smoked seafood, if you want to experience an old-fashioned beanhole supper – even if you’re curious about how to properly butcher a whole hog – Maine Fare is the place to be, whether you feel comfortable calling yourself a foodie or not.

“People need to know that it’s OK to care about what you eat, that it’s not being a snob to care about what you eat,” Jenkins said.

and Avery Yale Kamila tackles the topic of the keynote address “Can Maine Feed Itself?”

The panel brings together a number of movers and shakers from Maine’s food scene for a conversation centered on how the state can become more self-reliant when stocking our grocery stores and filling our dinner plates.

Also is today’s paper is an article about a Maine Cooperative Extension seminar designed to help farmers cope with this year’s poor growing season, and a short piece on Chef Hayward’s shaved head.