Archive for the ‘Fisheries’ Category

A Green Crab Fishery?

Sunday, August 14th, 2016

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports on an interesting effort to apply Venetian fishing practices in Maine to create a green crab fishery.

Moleche, anyone? A group of Georgetown fishermen and others are getting expert advice from Venice, Italy, to turn a rampant threat to Maine’s fisheries into a marketable part of the solution.

Nonesuch Oyster Tour

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

The Blueberry Files has published a report on the Nonesuch Oyster Tour.

Last month a friend of mine came to visit Maine, and we used that as an excuse to check out the Nonesuch Oyster aquaculture tours that owner Abigail Carroll has started offering. Carroll’s farm is located in the Nonesuch River off of scenic Pine Point in Scarborough. Her oysters can be found occasionally on Portland raw bar menus and at Harbor Fish Market. They’re characterized by their green shells and grassy flavors, which we learned all about why that is on our afternoon tour.

You can sign-up for a Nonesuch touch on Eventbrite.

Maine Eel Aquaculture

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

The Maine Sunday Telegram has published an article about Sara Rademaker and the interesting work she’s doing to develop a Maine-based eel fishery.

Three years ago she began studying European and Asian systems for growing elvers into eels in contained areas, asking herself the question, why not here in Maine, the biggest source of American baby glass eels in the country?

Although she’s just starting her third year developing her eel aquaculture system, she’s gearing up to bring her first eels to market this summer, with plans to tap into the local sushi market to begin with.

Maine Shrimp

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

The Maine shrimp fishery remains closed during the 2015-16 season.  However, as they did last year, regulators are allowing a very limited amount of shrimp to be caught for research purposes, the excess of those hauls will be sold. I was lucky enough to have a dish of them last year at Ebb & Flow and hope they’re able to get more this winter.

Climate Change Hampering Cod Recovery

Friday, October 30th, 2015

An article by GMRI scientist in the journal Science concludes that climate change driven warming in the Gulf of Maine is largely responsible for the species failure to recover, reports the Press Herald.

The study by Andrew Pershing, chief science officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, and 11 colleagues from that and three other research institutions found that warming-related stresses accounted for much of the discrepancy between what managers thought would happen to the stock and what actually occurred. The study was published Thursday in the journal Science.

Here’s a link to the study.

Winnegance Oyster Farm

Saturday, September 12th, 2015

Winnegance Oyster Farm (website, facebook) is now harvesting their first crop of oysters. Owner Jordan Kramer is taking orders via email and harvesting oysters ($15 for a dozen) each Friday for pick-up at his home in Portland.

Winnegance oysters are raised in the New Meadows River in the northern end of Casco Bay. Kramer hopes to launch an oyster CSA in 2016.

Missing Maine Mussels

Sunday, August 30th, 2015

Today’s Sunday Telegram explores the significant population decline of wild Maine mussels.

Scientists and environmentalists are working to find out why the once plentiful ‘people’s seafood’ has practically vanished from our rocky shores.

Seaweed and Maine Seaweed Festival

Wednesday, August 19th, 2015

Today’s Press Herald includes an article about the Maine Seaweed Festival and the rising interest of seaweed as a cooking ingredient.

But the story is a good metaphor for what’s going on in the world of seaweed right now. Consumers are discovering a local food source that has been around for millennia, but has rarely been used in American cooking and is little known except when ordered in a dish at a Japanese restaurant. Now Americans and western Europeans are beginning to embrace it, and at the same time realizing here in Maine that we’ve got our own handy local supply right on the coast.

Visit seaweedfest.com for more information on the Maine Seaweed Festival.

Local Food Initiative

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

The Bangor Daily News has published a report on a recent 1-day meeting of Mayor Brennan’s local food initiative.

To reach the city’s goals, members of the mayor’s subcommittee such as John Naylor, co-owner of Rosemont Market and Bakery, are strong disciples. Naylor, who spoke at the conference, works with 40 farmers and local food producers in his four markets, (the fifth Rosemont opens in Portland’s West End soon) and says a commitment is needed across the board to keep the movement robust.

Maine Shrimp Sample Harvest

Friday, February 20th, 2015

The Press Herald has a report in the ongoing sample harvests of Maine shrimp.

The record price stems from scarcity. Just like last year, the commercial shrimp season remains closed because of low stocks. The shrimp that sold at auction Thursday were caught by one of the three Maine fishermen involved in a sampling project to help state biologists track the timing of egg hatch, size, gender and developmental stages of the shrimp.

Scallop Divers

Sunday, January 25th, 2015

Today’s issue of the Maine Sunday Telegram includes an article about Maine’s diver scallop fishermen.

“I’ve been caught in currents and dragged,” said Brian Preney, 55, a diver out of Boothbay who is a member of the Urchin Advisory Council and has been fishing with scuba gear since 1980. He learned how to dive at Colby College, in the pool, and married into a family of fishermen. Fishing for urchins, which generally don’t take a diver below 30 feet, is like “picking cotton” in comparison to the more exciting pursuit of scallops, which have the power to dart away, fast. “I liken scalloping more to hunting.”

Gulf of Maine Fisheries

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

The New York Times published an article this week about the impact warming sea temperatures are having on cod and other fisheries in the Gulf of Maine.

In the vast gulf that arcs from Massachusetts’s shores to Canada’s Bay of Fundy, cod was once king. It paid for fishermen’s boats, fed their families and put their children through college. In one halcyon year in the mid-1980s, the codfish catch reached 25,000 tons.

Today, the cod population has collapsed. Last month, regulators effectively banned fishing for six months while they pondered what to do, and next year, fishermen will be allowed to catch just a quarter of what they could before the ban.

Shrimp Season Cancelled Again

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Federal regulators have again cancelled the Maine Shrimp season. According to a report in the Press Herald,

Federal regulators are canceling the commercial fishing season for shrimp in the Gulf of Maine for a second straight year, citing a population collapse blamed partly on rising ocean temperatures.

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission’s Northern Shrimp Section voted Wednesday in Portland to cancel the upcoming winter season. Regulators say the region’s population of northern shrimp fell dramatically from 2011 to 2013.

Uni is the New Bacon & WF’s Local Forager

Sunday, June 1st, 2014

Today’s Maine Sunday Telegram includes an interview with Kristen Bartlett, the Whole Foods staffer who tracks down locally made foods for the store’s shelves,

Is this a problem for her at parties? Is she swarmed by local farmers, waving organic broccoli and apple butters? Not yet, she says, though she wonders what will happen after her photo is published in Source.

and an article about Uni being declared the “new bacon” by Food & Wine magazine.

High-end restaurants in major cities have been experimenting with uni for a while, Branchina said. What’s more interesting to him is the big jump Browne Trading has seen in retail sales online: a 54 percent increase between 2012 and 2013, and so far in 2014, up 93 percent from the previous January to May.

Source: Alewives & Monsanto

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

Today’s Maine Sunday Telegram includes features on Maine’s relationship with Monsanto and Maine’s Alewife fishery.