Coffee Guru Bob Garver

The Maine Mouth has published a profile of Bob Garver. In addition to running Wicked Joe Coffee and being an co-owner of Bard Coffee, Garver is also a World Barista Championship sensory judge and was recently in Atlanta for the 2009 competition that saw Michael Phillips from the US place third behind competitors from the UK and Canada.

“What we’re primarily concerned about is the taste of the coffee,” says Garver. “What notes are in the coffee? Does the barista understand the coffee? How do they present it? Professionalism, passion, dedication…their overall attention to detail. All of those things are part of what we’re evaluating, but what matters most are taste scores.”

Interview with Gene DiMillo

The Press Herald has published a Shop Talk interview with Gene DiMillo. DiMillo is co-owner of G & R DiMillo’s, a sports bar and restaurant.

When we opened up I really thought the demographic would be ages 25 to 40. We had the menu of basically pub food, pizza and burgers. And we did some Italian dishes as well. And slowly it started morphing into the family restaurant idea, as we were getting people who used to go the Village. The age range now runs 25 to 80. It’s unbelievable how it’s changed, and we’ve revised the menu two or three times for that reason, different items that appeal to an older clientele.

Jennifer Flock, Sommelier

The Maine Switch has published a profile of Jennifer Flock and her ongoing effort to become a Master Sommelier.

Today, with all of her culinary knowledge and her experience in the service industry, you can imagine that Flock might be a rather intimidating dinner guest. “I have a friend who always says, ‘I have wine, but I don’t know if you want to drink it,’” Flock says with a laugh, but truly her friends needn’t worry. “I usually bring my own wine,” Flock explains, and probably that bottle is the first one drained.

Maine Food and Drink Ambassadors

This week’s edition of The Maine Switch includes an article on the Maine Food and Drink Ambassadors program recently launched by Margo Mallar.

When Margo Mallar volunteered at last fall’s Harvest on the Harbor festival, she realized Maine is filled with enthusiastic food lovers, but few have formal culinary training. So she’s decided to do something about it. The result is a brand new program called the Maine Food and Drink Ambassadors, which kicks off at the beginning of March with a series of classes exploring Maine-made cheeses.

Emilitsa

Maine Home + Design has published a profile of Emilitsa and the pair of brother, John and Denos Regas, that run it.

Emilitsa is their affectionate diminutive for Emily Regas, their mother. “When we opened, we finally realized what a gift our parents gave us,” says Denos of their childhood. “We wanted to recreate the kind of food we grew up with.” Which means, of course, using the finest ingredients and importing as much as possible directly from Greece. “We’re first generation,” explains John. “Our recipes are true to traditional Greek cooking; they haven’t been adulterated.”

Today’s Press Herald

Paciarino and its two owners, Fabiana de Savino and Enrico Barbiero, were profiled in the Food & Health section of today’s Press Herald.

“De Savino and Barbiero have been getting a taste of Maine through their newfound love for chowders. They hope customers will get a taste of their home country through Paciarino, which gets its name from an Italian word representing the special foods grandmothers prepare on Sundays.”

Also in today’s paper was a report on Lowe’s effort to help remodel the food distribution area at the Wayside Soup Kitchen.

Today's Press Herald

Paciarino and its two owners, Fabiana de Savino and Enrico Barbiero, were profiled in the Food & Health section of today’s Press Herald.

“De Savino and Barbiero have been getting a taste of Maine through their newfound love for chowders. They hope customers will get a taste of their home country through Paciarino, which gets its name from an Italian word representing the special foods grandmothers prepare on Sundays.”

Also in today’s paper was a report on Lowe’s effort to help remodel the food distribution area at the Wayside Soup Kitchen.