Archive for the ‘General News’ Category

Fall Issue of Edible Maine

Monday, September 25th, 2017

The latest issue of Edible Maine has hit newsstands. It includes:

  • Advice from chefs on throw holiday parties
  • An article by John Myers on bourbon and rye cocktails
  • An interview with Michael Landgarten, owner of Bob’s and Lil’s in Kittery
  • A profile of David Buchanan, ciderman and orchardist

Fork Food Lab, Apple Sleuthing

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017

The Food & Dining section of today’s Press Herald includes:

Fork Food Lab – A feature article on Fork Food Lab with profiles of three of the member businesses

A year after the food lab opened, Spillane has developed an eye for who will make it, and who will remain in hobby business limbo. He quizzes entrepreneurs in initial meetings to see how prepared they are: Do they have a business plan? Have they raised enough capital to keep them going for six months to a year? Have they chosen a distinctive name for their business, and is it trademark-able? Have they already reserved their handles for social media?

Apple Sleuthing – how to seek out and identify older trees that are one of Maine’s lost apples

What most excites me is the possibility that any tree could turn out to be one of the dozens of “lost” apple varieties that have vanished from the farms, yards and orchards of Maine. The need to find these varieties before the trees die – or the people who know where they are do – is urgent. Apple geeks, like me, like to play detective. We’re willing to invest the time and effort to track down every clue. But this is a team effort, and the apple historians of Maine need your help.

Oysters, Apples and Duck

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

This week’s Food & Dining section in the Press Herald includes:

Apple Map and Calendar

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

As part of their seasonal Apple series, the Press Herald has published a map of orchards that stock heritage apple varieties, a guide to when various apple varieties are in season and a new article by Sean Turley about heritage apples.

At the same time average apple consumers are strolling through orchards, there’s a manic search under way by apple obsessives on the hunt for unconventional and heirloom varietals that grow in small quantities across the state. Whereas most orchards in Maine grow only McIntosh, Cortland and, occasionally, Macoun, there are other orchards that provide a dizzyingly diverse array of varieties, from the latest creations provided by university agricultural experiment stations to apples that have been grown continuously in New England since the colonial era.

New Maine Apple Column

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

The first of this Fall’s weekly apple column was published today in the Press Herald.

Heirloom apples, though, are another matter. They are beguiling subjects of intense adoration for many people because they have so much more to say. Each one offers insights into our region’s history, its values, its sense of community and the interplay between the landscape that surrounds us and the terroir of the food we consume. Oh, and they often taste great, too.

You can follow columnist Sean Ryan Turley on instagram at The Righteous Russet.

Zapoteca Owners Face Lawsuits

Monday, September 4th, 2017

Tom and Shannon Bard, who closed Zapoteca in June, are the target of several lawsuits, reports the Press Herald.

Celebrated chef Shannon Bard and her husband are facing at least a dozen lawsuits from vendors who say the couple left a trail of unpaid bills when they closed Zapoteca, their popular Portland restaurant, in June.

‘Outsized Food Town in a Small Package’

Friday, September 1st, 2017

American Way magazine has published a well written article about the Portland food scene.

Portland certainly has the right ingredients for culinary success: a natural bounty from land and sea, a tradition of locavorism and a wealth of homegrown gastronomic talent combined with an influx from elsewhere, improving the quality and variety of food on offer. Sure, you could argue that the city has been on the nation’s food radar since at least 2009, when Bon Appétit named it “America’s Foodiest Small Town.” But in the years since (especially the last three), it’s upped its own ante, thanks to a second wave of chefs and a populace that’s literally eating it up.

The author interviewed Paige Gould, Andrew Taylor, Mike Wiley, Michelle Corry, Courtney Packer, Clayton Norris and Peter Hale for the article.

Campaign for a Lobster Emoji

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

Luke’s Lobster founder Luke Holden has launched a campaign to convince the Unicode Consortium to add a lobster to the standard set of emojis, reports the Press Herald.

You can make your voice heard and show your support for this initiative by signing the Change.org petition.

Otto on Inc. 5000 List

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

Otto Pizza is one of 12 Maine companies on Inc. magazine’s list of the 5000 fastest growing companies.

A Call for Weekly Reviews

Sunday, August 13th, 2017

A letter to the editor from Kennebunk resident Deborah Mathieu has asked why the Maine Sunday Telegram doesn’t publish a restaurant review 52 weeks of the year.

With fewer people reading newspapers, I would think the Press Herald would make it a priority to have write-ups that are of local interest and not from the Associated Press, which one can read anywhere.

Really, if you can’t find someone to do a weekly review, then it’s time to have more than one writer.

Jewish Food Revival

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

The Press Herald has published an article about the revival of Jewish food, a trend here in the Portland area and across the country.

Conley isn’t the only food entrepreneur trying to fill this particular niche, although most are doing it in smaller ways. Union Bagel in Portland makes bialys on the weekends. Just a stone’s throw away, Atsuko Fujimoto bakes babka on Fridays at Ten Ten Pié. Out on Brighton Avenue, Elise Richer makes knishes at Tin Pan Bakery, and Audrey Farber is baking traditional Jewish breads at the Fork Food Lab. In North Yarmouth, the smoked fish topping on Krista Desjarlais’ Montreal-style bagels delights customers who used to live in New York.

New Technology Use in Restaurants

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

The Press Herald has taken a look at the digital technologies being used in Portland restaurants.

New technology, from simple apps that speed up the ordering process to robots that help busy bartenders make Jell-O shots, is making inroads into the restaurant business. But with concerns over the cost and the impact on customers’ dining experience, embracing some of these changes may take time – especially in smaller, independently owned restaurants like most of those in Portland.

Nitro Cold Brew Grows in Popularity

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

The Press Herald has published an article on the growing popularity of nitro cold brew coffee.

It wasn’t that long ago that cold brew coffee became the new, hip drink in coffee bars all around the country. Now that cold brew is mainstream (you can get it at Dunkin’ Donuts) a subset of that category, nitro coffee, is fast becoming the new favorite among coffee drinkers who like specialty brews and trying something new – and who don’t mind paying $4 or more per 16-ounce cup.

Bayside: Kick Start Kitchen

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

Proposals under consideration for West Bayside development on the site of the former public works department buildings include,

At 65 Hanover St., staff is recommending a proposal by Rory Strunk, of O’Maine Studios, for a “world-class culinary media and event center that has a global draw.” In addition to having a “Kick Start Kitchen” for incubating aspiring chefs, the building also could host food festivals.

Bayside Restaurant Challenges

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

The Press Herald has published an article on the challenges Bayside restaurants face as the number of people seeking help at Preble Street has increased.

“It definitely is a challenge for us every day,” Stratton said. “I don’t want to say anything negative about the (Preble Street) resource center. I think the resource center is a great thing for the city. I do appreciate what they do, but as far as a business-friendly neighborhood? We are not located in one.”